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The Appalachian Studies Association was formed in 1977 by a group of scholars, teachers, and regional activists who believed that shared community has been and will continue to be important to those writing, researching, and teaching about Appalachia.

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38th ASA Annual Conference

Many Mountains, Many Musics

March 27-29, 2015

East Tennessee State University,
Johnson City, Tennessee

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Awards

Awards Chair: Emily Satterwhite (satterwhite@vt.edu)

The Appalachian Studies Association presents the following awards at its annual conference in March. Deadlines for nominations typically fall in December or January. Past recipients are listed here.

Cratis D. Williams/James S. Brown Service Award
Weatherford Awards
Helen M. Lewis Community Service Award
Jack Spadaro Documentary Award
Award for Excellence in Teaching Appalachian Studies
Carl A. Ross Appalachian Student Paper Award
e-Appalachia Award for Outstanding Website
Wilma Dykeman "Faces of Appalachia" Post-doctoral Research Fellowship

 

Cratis D. Williams/James S. Brown Service Award

The Williams/Brown Award is given to an individual who has made exemplary contributions to Appalachia, Appalachian studies, and/or the Appalachian Studies Association.

About the Award
This award was instituted in 1993 as the Cratis D. Williams Service Award. Cratis (pronounced KRAY-tiss) Williams helped pioneer the field of Appalachian studies with his influential 1961 Ph.D. dissertation, “The Southern Mountaineer in Fact and Fiction.” Dr. Williams’ work is characterized by his interdisciplinary approach to understanding the cultural life and history of the region. The symposium held upon his retirement from Appalachian State University in 1976 was a catalyst for the formation of the Appalachian Studies Association.

In 2000, the award was renamed to also honor James S. Brown. Jim Brown devoted a career to understanding community life in eastern Kentucky. He graduated from Berea College in 1937 and began his studies at Harvard in 1941, focusing his research on kinship structure, social change, and the settlement of migrants from rural Kentucky into new urban settings. A sociologist on the faculty of the University of Kentucky from 1946 to 1982, Dr. Brown’s pioneering studies of the region’s society, demography, and migration provided a solid foundation for the field of Appalachian studies.

Nominations
There is a two-step selection process for the Williams/Brown Award.
1) Nominations, due to the chair of the selection committee by January 15, should include a brief statement regarding the individual’s specific contributions and/or the individual’s c.v./résumé.
2) Following a review of the nominations, the selection committee will determine if they would like to request additional information about one or more finalists before selecting the award recipient.

Chair of the Selection Committee
John Hennen, Associate Professor of History, 305 Rader Hall, Morehead, KY, 40351, j.hennen@moreheadstate.edu.

Past Recipients
Return to list of awards

 

Weatherford Awards

The Weatherford Awards, presented jointly by the ASA and Berea College, honor works published in the prior calendar year that “best illuminate the challenges, personalities, and unique qualities of the Appalachian South.” Awards are given in three categories: nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. The winners each receive $500.

About the Award
The oldest of all these awards, the Weatherford was instituted in 1970, before the ASA was formed. Established by Alfred Perrin of Cincinnati, the award was originally supported by Berea College’s Appalachian Center and Hutchins Library. In 2000, the ASA replaced the Hutchins Library as the joint supporter with Berea’s Appalachian Center, which in 2008 was renamed the Loyal Jones Appalachian Center.

The awards commemorate the life and achievements of W.D. Weatherford, Sr., a pioneer and leading figure for many years in Appalachian development, youth work, and race relations, and of his son, Willis D. Weatherford, Jr., late Berea College President.

Through 2002, the award was given only to a single book. From 2003 to 2009, two awards were given, one for a work a non-fiction and one for a work of fiction or poetry. In 2010, a third Weatherford Award for a work of poetry was established to honor the life and work of Dr. Grace Toney Edwards, former Director of the Appalachian Regional Studies Center at Radford University.

For further information, see http://www.berea.edu/appalachiancenter/weatherford/default.asp.

Nominations
The only requirement is that the subject matter of the books be Appalachian or that they be set in Appalachia. All nominations for the Weatherford Awards must be made before December 31, 2013, and all entries must be originally published in 2013. Anyone may nominate, but each nomination in any of the three categories must include seven copies of the nominated work.

Chair of the Selection Committee
Chris Green, Director, Loyal Jones Appalachian Center, CPO 2166, 205 North Main Street, Berea College, Berea, KY 40404.

Past Recipients
Return to list of awards

 

Helen M. Lewis Community Service Award

The Helen Lewis Award is given to an individual or an organization that has made exemplary contributions to Appalachia through involvement with and service to its people and communities.

About the Award
Instituted in 2001, this award honors educator and activist Helen Lewis. In 1969, Lewis taught the one of the first known courses in Appalachian Studies at Clinch Valley College (now University of Virginia at Wise). Lewis shaped the field of Appalachian studies by emphasizing community participation and challenging traditional perceptions of the region and its people. Her contributions to the region, including her activist work with Appalshop and The Highlander Center, are recorded in a collection of Lewis’s writings and memories, Helen Matthews Lewis: Living Social Justice in Appalachia (2012).

Nominations
Nominations, due by January 31, should include a statement regarding the individual or organization’s specific contributions to the region or its people, accompanied by at least two letters of support.

Chair of the Selection Committee
Sandy Ballard, Belk Library, Box 32026, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608, ballardsl@appstate.edu.

Past Recipients
Return to list of awards

 

Jack Spadaro Documentary Award

The Spadaro Award is given annually to recognize the producer of the best film, video, radio, television, or other media presentation on Appalachia or its people. The winner receives $250.

About the Award
The award, established in 2005, honors the activist and whistleblower Jack Spadaro, who spent his career working within the coal mining industry for the betterment of the Appalachian community.

Nominations
Nominations should be made by January 31. Works may be entered by the producer, an agent, sponsoring organization or company, or distributor. (The producer may also be the director.) Applicants need not be members of the Appalachian Studies Association. There is no entry fee. Entrants will receive notification of receipt of entry/entries by e-mail. All reasonable care will be taken; however, no responsibility is accepted for loss or damage, or for entries that are not received by the due date.

Eligibility
A work shall be eligible if the content focuses primarily on an Appalachian subject. The producer is defined as that person who has the artistic vision. Producers may be citizens or residents of any country. Producers may be deceased. Works of joint authorship are eligible (defined as joint responsibility by two producers). Works may not be entered in the name of a committee. The work must be the producer’s work and not work for hire. The decision by the Award Committee of an entrant’s eligibility is final.

Judging
The Award will go to the entrant judges deem to possess the highest merit. Only one award will be given annually. Judges shall declare relevant conflicts of interest immediately. The decision of the judges is final and conclusive.

Technical Requirements for Submission
All title entries must be finished and not works-in-progress. Videos must be on DVD, CD, Internet based, or a 1⁄2" VHS formatted tape. If not in English, video must include English subtitles or an English transcript. Each cassette/DVD must be clearly labeled with the following information:

Name of submitting organization, individual, or company
Title of Work
Length: running time

Please send three (3) copies of each title entered through a secure courier that provides a tracking service. Submissions cannot be returned to the sender.

Chair of the Selection Committee
Jack Wright, 5616 Marion Johnson Rd, Athens, OH 45701, jwright@ohio.edu.

Past Recipients
Return to list of awards

 

Award for Excellence in Teaching Appalachian Studies

The Excellence in Teaching Award is given to one individual who has taught Appalachian Studies coursework. The winning teacher receives $250.

About the Award
The award was established in 2013 by the ASA Education Committee chaired by Carol Baugh. The ASA Steering Committee is interested in identifying potential sponsors for this award. For inquiries, please contact ASA Awards Chair Emily Satterwhite at satterwhite@vt.edu.

Nominations
Candidates may be nominated or may self-nominate. Nomination packets must be submitted in a single .pdf file as an attachment to an email to the selection committee chair by January 31.
DEADLINE EXTENDED TO FEB. 17, 2014.

Criteria and documentation requirements for the award are as follows:
1) A completed nomination form, available here (DOC | PDF) or by contacting the chair of the selection committee.
2) One-page letter of nomination or self-nomination.
3) One-page statement of teaching philosophy.
4) Brief (one- to two-page) curriculum vita that includes Appalachian Studies coursework, teaching awards, and other teaching projects that reflect excellence.
5) Documentation that includes syllabus or syllabi (nominees will be asked to add their syllabus or syllabi to the ASA website under Resources) and one complete set of student evaluations from an Appalachian studies course, including scores and comments.
6) Up to two additional pages of documentation, such as peer evaluations from colleagues, letters of support or other documentation from former students, and information regarding professional development activities.

Chair of the Selection Committee
Carol Baugh, chair of the Education Committee, carol.baugh@sinclair.edu.

Past Recipients
Return to list of awards

 

Carl A. Ross Student Paper Award

The Ross Award is granted to one student in each of two categories: middle/high school students and undergraduate/graduate students. The authors of the winning papers receive $100 each.

About the Award
Established in 1984 as the "Student Paper Award," this award honors Carl A. Ross, Professor of History and Director of the Center for Appalachian Studies at Appalachian State University at the time of his death in 1988.

Nominations
All papers must adhere to guidelines for scholarly research. Middle/high school papers should be 12 - 15 pages in length. Undergraduate/graduate papers should be 20 - 30 pages in length. Nominations should be submitted by emailing a Microsoft Word copy of the paper to the chair of the selection committee before January 31.

Students submitting papers must be enrolled in courses at the time of the conference. To verify their student status for the spring term, students can submit one of the following: a copy of a schedule of classes or transcripts indicating enrollment or a letter from a faculty advisor verifying the student’s status, which should include the faculty member’s email address, phone number, and mailing address.

Students who wish to present their papers at the conference must also submit a Proposal for Participation following the submission guidelines. Costs of attending the conference are the winners’ responsibility. Students may be eligible for scholarships.

Chair of the Selection Committee
Casey LaFrance, TC-Lafrance@wiu.edu.

Past Recipients
Return to list of awards

 

e-Appalachia Award for Outstanding Website

The e-Appalachia Award is given annually in recognition of an outstanding website that provides insight on Appalachia and its people, or provides a vital community service to Appalachians. The winner receives $250.

About the Award
The award was established in 2001 by the Website Committee chaired by Phil Obermiller.

Nominations
Candidates may be nominated or may self-nominate. By January 31, nominators should send the following to the chair of the selection committee: name of the website, url of the website, name and contact info for the nominator, and (if different) the name and contact info for a representative of the website.

Chair of the Selection Committee
Eryn Roles, chair of the website committee, roles1@marshall.edu.

Past Recipients
Return to list of awards

 

Wilma Dykeman "Faces of Appalachia" Post-doctoral Research Fellowship

The Dykeman Fellowship provides $4,000 to one recent Ph.D. to support research related to gender, race, and/or ethnicity in Appalachia in years when funding is available from the fellowship’s endowment.

About the Award
The fellowship honors Wilma Dykeman Stokely, whose nonfiction and novels chronicle the people and land of East Tennessee. It was instituted in 2008 with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Appalachian Studies Association.

Nominations
Beginning in 2013, the Dykeman Fellowship was temporarily suspended due to lack of funds.

Contact
Linda Spatig, spatig@marshall.edu.

Past Recipients
Return to list of awards