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The Appalachian Studies Association was formed in 1977 by a group of scholars, teachers, and regional activists who believed that shared community has been and will continue to be important to those writing, researching, and teaching about Appalachia.

Join ASA

The ASA is headquartered at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. Mary Thomas, Executive Director, and Christopher Leadingham, Office Manager, can be reached via email at mthomas@marshall.edu and leadingham6@marshall.edu, respectively.

Telephone: (304) 696-2904
Fax: (304) 696-6221
Mailing Address:
    Appalachian Studies Association
    One John Marshall Drive
    Huntington, WV 25755

40th ASA Annual Conference

EXTREME Appalachia!

March 9-12, 2017

Virginia Tech,
Blacksburg, Virginia

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K-12 Educational Resources for Teaching Appalachian Topics

Introduction

The list includes entries for teaching in and about the Appalachian region for use by teachers in the K-12 classroom, as well as resources for teachers pursuing advanced degrees. Inclusion on the list is not an assurance of quality.

The original list of educational resources was developed by Philip Obermiller and posted to the ASA website in 2001. In 2011, when the current version of the website was developed, the list was updated. Links were updated, entries were reorganized into new categories, and a few entries were added to the list. If you have any additions or revisions for the list, or would like to share your experiences using some of these resources, please contact us.

Audiovisual Resources

Appalachian Music

Source: Association for Cultural Equity
Description: Film clips of various types of Appalachian music with lesson plans to accompany film clips.

Applit

Description: This site provides pages on articles dealing with Appalachia, literature lists, bibliographies, lesson plans, and study guides.
Source: Created by Judy A. Teaford and Tina Hanlon, Ferrum College; Maintained by Tina Hanlon

Audio Samples of Traditional Anecdotes with Transcripts

Description: “Many terms in the transcripts are linked to dictionary entries so that browsers can find more detail on them, including further quotations, etymologies, and sometimes brief word histories.”
Source: Michael Montgomery of University of South Carolina

Countdown to the Millennium Project Radio Series

Source: Countdown to the Millennium Oral History Project
Description: Lessons Plans are available to accompany a radio series on oral history and Appalachian themes.

Educational Programs Including Sound Recordings, Photographs, and Manuscripts

Source: Archives of Appalachia